5 Steps To Wake Up The Badass Inside You - girl looking at flying balloons and being happy

5 Steps To Wake Up The Badass Inside You

5 steps I took to awaken the badass that was already in me

Being regularly undermined rarely doesn’t leave a mark on a person. It definitely did a number on me. Whether it was a family member telling me (from quite an early age) I needed a man to put me in place, because I was way too opinionated and assertive for a woman, or a guy at work daily trying to diminish my value by calling me ‘little girl’, instead of my name. After more than two decades of such regular undermining, I didn’t question them much – I believed them. I second-guessed my every single step. I would analyze my tone and what I was saying to not sound too assertive or commanding. I was in an emotionally abusive relationship for longer than I care to admit because I thought that was normal – somebody had to put me in my place, remember? It is a vicious cycle; the more you let them, the more they put you down. It takes a lot of strength to fight it, break the cycle, but it is possible. And once you beat them, beat all that undermining, underestimating of yourself, you are freaking invincible.

Everyone has their own path and their own demons, so there is no unique approach. I can only share my journey and hope it will inspire you to awaken that badass inside of you who doesn’t take other people’s shit and that marches to the beat of their own drum. So without further ado, here’s what I did:

I reversed my approach

Instead of always considering what others said to be the truth and second-guessing my every single thought, I started second-guessing what others said and started believing in myself.

I started saying no

I was so lousy with boundaries, in a way that others could really push me around. Once I changed that, some people left and took their toxicity with them.

I reassured myself daily

I haven’t converted overnight to this confident superwoman. As a matter of fact, I still haven’t. Everyday I remind myself of my own worth, remind myself of how strong I am and how I only lose my strength by second-guessing it.

I started taking it as a compliment

Once I changed the way I interpreted the undermining comments, it was much easier to just shake them off. Before, a comment like ‘you are way to opinionated and assertive’ or ‘you should focus on starting to build a family, not a career’ used to feel so belittling (which it still is, don’t get me wrong). I now see those comments as personal applauds for how provocatively successful I am.

I became more vocal about supporting others on their own quests for greatness

Not that before I wasn’t cheering for others, I just wasn’t that upfront or vocal about it (and I am sorry for that). Loudly cheering and supporting others really is an awesome feeling, an amazing deed, and a catalyst for your own greatness.


And there you have it. Every little step altogether resulted in a great new energy of, to put it bluntly, being a BADASS. And badasses do amazing stuff.

If you enjoyed this read, check out 10 Things You Can Do To Improve Your Mental Well-being.

Related topic:

How To Deal With Invasive and Nosy People

If you enjoyed this read, subscribe to my mailing list so I can keep you updated with the latest posts, regular freebies, amazing opportunities, exclusive discounts and more. Also, by joining the list, you receive right away for FREE the amazing 30 Day Self-Care Challenge and a Printable Calendar!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Things You Are Missing Out On When You Stop Drinking - A woman peacefully enjoying her tea

5 Things You Are Missing Out On When You Stop Drinking

What To Expect When Quitting Alcohol For Good

As a self-proclaimed and newly formed advocate for sobriety, I’ve decided to make a list of the things I’ve noticed that I have missed out on ever since I ended my long-term and toxic relationship with alcohol (pun intended).

If you’re considering sobriety or you are in the early stages and need some additional tools to help you out, check out my post about 4 apps you can use to help you out in early sobriety.

If you ever wondered what would happen and what would you potentially be missing out on if you stopped drinking booze for good, this article is for you. So let’s dive right into it – here are the things I’ve been missing out on (but didn’t really miss) ever since I went alcohol-free:

Hangovers and hangxiety

As someone who struggles with anxiety and who used to have severe pain attacks, hangover anxiety was pretty awful. As much as I don’t miss the physical distress of having a hangover (headaches, nausea, dizziness, name it), the emotional one was even worse sometimes.

Feelings of embarrassment and shame the day after

I would remember some dumb stuff I’d said the night before and would just feel so embarrassed the day after. It was the little things – like I’d remember I really opened up to someone I barely knew or I’d be way to honest about my opinions with someone I didn’t care for sharing them.

Hanging out with people whose company you don’t actually enjoy

Okay, this one was a hard one to admit. I mean, that you’d hung out in bars with people whose company you didn’t even enjoy that much just for the couple of beers you’d drink together isn’t something you’d like to learn about yourself. But, nevertheless, it is the truth – and if you consider yourself a moderate drinker or you used to be one, there’s a good chance you have at least once experienced this (and that is okay – once we accept that part of us, we learn to avoid that behaviour and be better versions of ourselves).

Feeling bloated and swollen

I don’t know how common this one is, but it was a relief to get rid of it.

Restless sleep

Sure, after a couple of drinks I’d fall asleep (pass out) in a matter of seconds, but I usually wouldn’t sleep well for the rest of the night and would wake up tired, as if I slept half less than I actually did.


I could name some more, but these are the ones that first come to mind when I hear the words ‘you’re missing out’ or ‘then what do you do for fun if you don’t drink’. When I drank, I feared I would be missing out on the fun if I quit, but now I see that is not even close to the truth. Getting rid of the booze came down to just throwing out the bad stuff – and honestly it was the best decision I ever made.

What are the things you fear you’d be missing out on? Let me know in the comments – I’d love to address them in a future post. You’d be giving me great insight and I’d love to share my perspective. If you’re a fellow sobriety enthusiast or you’re sober curious (all of which are great shifts toward a better life), what are the things you’d add to my list? Let me know as well. I’d love to chat!

If you like this read, look into the 3 Things I Learned About Myself After Quitting Alcohol.

Until next time,

Common Unicorn

If you enjoyed this read, subscribe to my mailing list so I can keep you updated with the latest posts, regular freebies, amazing opportunities, exclusive discounts and more. Also, by joining the list, you receive right away for FREE the amazing 30 Day Self-Care Challenge and a Printable Calendar!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.
Things I learned about myself after quitting drinking - a girl with a hopeful look on her face

3 Things I Learned About Myself After Quitting Alcohol

The Benefits of Giving Up Alcohol For Good

For some time I was playing with the idea of quitting drinking alcohol in my head, but the reasons not to were usually stronger (it seemed fun?!, a social thing, a celebratory thing, etc.). I did not like how booze made me feel neither while drinking (lazy, sleepy) nor after the fact (hangover anxiety, which was absolutely horrifying every time). Thinking about it now, I just don’t understand how I didn’t come to realise it sooner that it was doing me absolutely NO good and that I actually did not like it. But, when we normalise, even romanticise alcohol we usually do not see it for what it is.

Something changed for me at the beginning of 2021 (still not sure how or what exactly, but I am glad it did) and I decided to quit drinking for a while – you could say I was sober curious. After making that decision I drank twice more in January (which is nothing compared to my usual 2-3, okay 4 times a week) and both times even while still drinking I thought to myself what the ?! and why did I ever think this was enjoyable. Not to mention that the cripling hangover anxiety, or hangxiety, the day after is so not worth it. There was really no reason left for me to have that glass of wine now and then because I didn’t even want it anymore – that is when I made the radical choice not to drink anymore at all, and when the wonderful benefits of that decision came marching in my life.

During the month of sober curiosity and then a couple of months of sobriety, I can tell you at least 3 amazing things I’ve come to truly learn and appreciate about myself since going alcohol-free:

Noticing alcohol was only numbing me

If I was having fun drinking, it was because of the company and/or the activity and not the booze. Otherwise I was just numbing whatever needed to be numbed. Not wanting to drink anymore made me realise this and recognise it – now I attend activities and gatherings I want to, that are fun and exciting, and avoid the ones that are not (and only seemed like fun because of all the alcohol that numbed the truth).

Discovering I am a morning person

This may sound foolish, but for so long I thought I was not a morning person and hated waking up early, I was always tired and grumpy. Not drinking alcohol improved my sleep immensely. Being fresh and rested in the morning had an amazing effect on me – I developed an elaborate morning routine I am actually excited about and enjoy it. Now I can’t wait to wake up early – even on the weekends I am up before 8am, sipping my fresh cup of coffee by the window and just enjoying life.

Finding out my hidden passion for journaling and writing

This one is more of a rediscovery. Quitting alcohol has an amazing effect on ones introspection. I started to be more mindful and self-observing, allowing myself to reconsider my belief system, as well as my likes and dislikes. There was this surge of emotional revelations that needed an outlet and I somehow remembered myself as a kid – I LOVED to write. Journal, poems, short stories, you name it. I was always scribing something. And there you have it – the need to let all of these emotions out and my love for writing together created this blog.


I could name a dozen and more amazing things that happen when you decide your body and mind don’t deserve and don’t need to be abused by alcohol. But for now I will leave you with these 3, as they are the strongest and most captivating lessons I have experienced on this journey that has merely just began.

Related topic:

5 Things You Are Missing Out On When You Stop Drinking

If you’re considering sobriety or you are in the early stages and need some additional tools to help you out, check out my post about 4 apps you can use to help you out in early sobriety.

If you enjoyed this read, subscribe to my mailing list so I can keep you updated with the latest posts, regular freebies, amazing opportunities, exclusive discounts and more. Also, by joining the list, you receive right away for FREE the amazing 30 Day Self-Care Challenge and a Printable Calendar!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.